2021 OHA Biennial Conference

Oral History in Troubling Times: Opportunities & Challenges

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Presenters

Our conference features a broad range of presenters from throughout Australia and overseas.

Profiles of some of our most prominent presenters are featured here. We will also be posting conference abstracts to this page when available.

Mark Cave

Keynote speaker

Mark Cave is the Past President of the International Oral History Association, Senior Curator at The Historic New Orleans Collection, and co-editor of Listening on the EdgeOral History in the Aftermath of Crisis (2014).

His keynote is titled ‘Why Did This Happen? Making Meaningful Answers in the Aftermath of Crisis’. He will explore the limitations of the media in the aftermath of crisis and argue that oral history has an important role to play alongside journalism in creating explanations that not only help communities move beyond crisis but help them move beyond crisis in ways that make them stronger.

Pre-conference workshops

Introducing oral history

Jill Cassidy is an Honorary Research Associate with the Queen Victoria Museum & Art Gallery. She is President of Oral History Tasmania and Vice President of Oral History Australia.

Interpreting memories

Alistair Thomson is Professor of History at Monash University and President of Oral History Australia.

Producing mobilebased audio walks from oral histories

Hamish Sewell is a former RN producer and the founder of the Soundtrails application. 

Interviewing and the art of asking questions

Linda Hunt is a lecturer in media and communication at the University of Tasmania. Before joining UTAS, Linda was a broadcast journalist for ABC News and has reported, produced and presented news on radio and television.

Podcasting oral history

Michael Green writes and produces audio documentaries and multimedia stories for outlets including ABC RN, BBC World Service, The Guardian, SBS and The Monthly. He is the producer and host of the Walkley Awardwinning podcast, The Messenger and a coordinator ofBehind the Wire, an awardwinning oral history project about Australian immigration detention.

Palawa and Pakana presenters, final plenary

 Julie Gough

Julie Gough

Dr Julie Gough is an artist and writer, and a curator at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery. Her Briggs-Johnson family have lived in the Latrobe region of North-West Tasmania since the 1840s, with Tebrikunna their Traditional Country in far north-eastern Lutruwita (Tasmania). Gough’s research and art process involves uncovering and re-presenting often conflicting and subsumed histories, many referring to her family’s experiences as Tasmanian Aboriginal people. Gough completed a PhD, University of Tasmania (2001) and MA, Goldsmiths College, University of London (1998).  Since 1994 Julie has exhibited in more than 130 exhibitions and her art is held in most state and national collections.

Theresa Santy

Theresa Santy

Theresa Sainty is a Pakana woman from the north-east of Tasmania. She has worked extensively with the Tasmanian Department of Aboriginal Education Services where she co-developed and provided Aboriginal Cultural Awareness training and produced a number of curricula. She is also an Aboriginal Linguistic Consultant with the palawa kani Language Program, and is a Senior Indigenous Scholar at the University of Tasmania.

Mark Cave

Mark Cave

Keynote speaker

Mark Cave is the Past President of the International Oral History Association, Senior Curator at The Historic New Orleans Collection, and co-editor of Listening on the EdgeOral History in the Aftermath of Crisis (2014).

His keynote is titled ‘Why Did This Happen? Making Meaningful Answers in the Aftermath of Crisis’. He will explore the limitations of the media in the aftermath of crisis and argue that oral history has an important role to play alongside journalism in creating explanations that not only help communities move beyond crisis but help them move beyond crisis in ways that make them stronger.

Adam Thompson

Adam Thompson

Adam Thompson is an emerging Aboriginal (pakana) writer from Tasmania, who writes contemporary short fiction. In 2016–17, Adam received writing awards through the Tamar Valley Writers Festival and the Tasmanian Writers and Readers Festival. Adam has been awarded a First Nations Fellowship at Varuna – The Writers House, several Arts Tasmania grants, and was one of ten recipients of The Next Chapter initiative through the Wheeler Centre.

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